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2021-2022 Football Schedules


FBGUY1989
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15 hours ago, Jullian said:

Gotta question for any Lakeland fan. 
 

I have a gentleman that comes to my PT office in So Flo. He’s a Dreadnaught. He graduated in 1967. He goes by the name, “Speedy John Rachel”. He’s gotta thousand(interesting) stories. Great guy. 
anyone know him? 

I can’t say that I do but thanks for asking.  He graduated a decade before I was born.  Maybe another Naught might know him.  It’s fascinating to see how far out the alum base spreads. I imagine that holds true for everyone. 

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11 hours ago, Hwy17 said:

Good players on bad teams still get recruited.  

 

10 hours ago, Ray Icaza said:

Or from small towns like Hwy 17.  When I attended Osceola in the mid 60's we played in the Ridge conference ... Sebring , Avon Park, Mulberry, Fort Meade, Frostproof, Lake Placid, etc..  Those little schools could kick A-- and those top players not only got recruited, but to top tier schools.  If you can play,  They Will Find You!!

Yes, they will find you.  However, guiding a ship (recruiters) ashore is so much easier with a lighthouse as apposed to a flashlight, LOL.

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4 hours ago, Hwy17 said:

Here is what I would propose (for football):  

1. Students transferring from a school greater than 50 miles would be exempt from the transfer cap. Simply fill out a form indicating from what school the student transferred from and that it was more than 50 miles away.

2. Students transferring from a school less than 50 miles away but can show that their family legitimately moved and are now zoned for the new school would be exempt from the transfer cap. Simply fill out a form and provide documentation of the move.

3. Students transferring from less than 50 miles and who have not moved into the school's zone will be non-exempt from the cap policy. Must fill out form showing where they transferred from.

4. The transfer cap will be limited by classification. Schools accepting more transfers than allowed by classification may do so by moving up in classification to the corresponding class.

5. Transfer Cap applies to non-exempt transfers and is as follows:

      1A-3A: 3 transfers

      4A-6A: 4 transfers

       7A-8A: 5 transfers

6. Any school accepting more than 5 non-exempt transfers must go independent and may not compete in the playoffs. 

 

 

I like your thinking Hwy.  I do have 1 question.  Does your proposal take in account a family moving from county to county regardless of distance or would the proposal be a 1 size fits all regardless of the county line boundaries?

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51 minutes ago, Nulli Secundus said:

I like your thinking Hwy.  I do have 1 question.  Does your proposal take in account a family moving from county to county regardless of distance or would the proposal be a 1 size fits all regardless of the county line boundaries?

Yes, if it's a legit move and the student will be playing for the school they are now zoned for then they'll be exempt from the transfer cap.

Example: Student lives in Plant City but wants to play for Lakeland. Lakeland can accept his transfer but would count him towards the max number of 5 transfers they could take.  However, if the family legitimately moved it wouldn't mater. Fill out the form and provide proof of new address.  

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7 hours ago, Ray Icaza said:

You must not be a boater.

Because if you were you would know most lighthouses identify shoal areas, reefs or other navigational hazards to avoid; not a guide to get you to shore.  Case in point, in the FL Keys when trying to find your way to shore safely said lighthouses (Alligator Light, American Shoal, Sand Key LIght, etc.) are 2 miles to your rear.  At night your safe guide to shore are navigational markers/channel markers, so how do you see them at night?  With a Flashlight (Q-Beam).  So you see, your cute little analogy is really half ass backwards.  LOL

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9 hours ago, Nulli Secundus said:

I like your thinking Hwy.  I do have 1 question.  Does your proposal take in account a family moving from county to county regardless of distance or would the proposal be a 1 size fits all regardless of the county line boundaries?

One thing I left out. Incoming freshmen wouldn't count either. Free game to go wherever. Only after they've been somewhere would this apply. 

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13 hours ago, Jambun82 said:

Yes, I think it is accurate although I am sure parents play a role in the child's decisions, and some parents go overboard, not doubt about that. The inner-city schools in Miami win because the good coaches change jobs, and the most talented kids choose to play for that coach at that school. It is no coincidence  that several coaches have won state titles, or had great success at multiple schools in Dade or Broward County. Like Billy Rolle, Willy Bueno, and Tim "Ice" Harris. That is also why those schools win in cycles for instance when I was in High School Southridge was at the top with Don Soldinger as the coach, or Killian or South Dade was really good for a while, or Carol City with Walt Frazier. The players switch schools fof fooball, but then also have a chance to get a really good education as well when he'/she transfers from Raines to Bolles or a public school in Broward County to Aquinas. 

Everything you said is accurate but a lot of the talent live in those neighborhoods so it's not all transfers and those coaches you mentioned are legendary. Oh I see you mentioned Southridge but what's going on with them because they have fallen off.

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14 hours ago, Jambun82 said:

All right, Perspective does your litmus test about "leaving your brothers behind" apply to coaches who change jobs every few years because another school has more talent and thus a better chance to win a state championship? Does that kind of loyalty mean anything? Do those players that the coach is leaving behind , and now have to learn a new system as well as philosophy, mean anything?   As far as 'leaving your brothers behind" how is that going to help a young man or woman who wants to have a chance at at college scholarship? Do you think College Football coaches care about that? Do you think that is going to help him or her later on in life?  As far as a job getting too hard, I have got news for you in this current Pandemic-Era environment, most people are going to leave jobs that they are unhappy with or is "too hard." Similar to how lawyers quit cases all the time because there is no chance to win. There are all kinds of opportunities with the gig economy and side hustles, and most people are going to look out for number 1, themselves and their family. Loyalty, or lack of it, goes both ways in that regard. The kind of character development that I am familiar with is the sort that has you doing what is best yourself because nobody else will do that for you. I fine it pretty interesting or amusing the leftists go on and on about choice, choice with your body, choice with your habits, even choice with your gender, but are seemingly so threatened by school choice, and holding the taxpayer-funded public schools accountable.  VeniceIndiansFootball bring up great points, and he is tired of reading that the program that he roots for run down on this message board when plenty of schools are accepting transfers.  Venice might have been the second best team in the state of Florida for many years, but when they had to compete against the Ft. Lauderdale All-Star team in the 7A semifinals every year, what do you expect? 

Col. Jessup: You want answers?

Kaffee: I think I'm entitled to.

Col. Jessep: You want answers?

Kaffee: I WANT THE TRUTH!

Col. Jessup: YOU CAN'T HANDLE THE TRUTH!

Just a little levity to start things out.   But, I'll do my best to answer your questions, Jambun, because you typically raise good questions. 

All right, Perspective does your litmus test about "leaving your brothers behind" apply to coaches who change jobs every few years because another school has more talent and thus a better chance to win a state championship?   To be honest, I haven't seen much of this, especially at the head coach level.  But even for assistant coaches, I haven't seen much movement - at least not in the Tampa Bay area.   That said, I make a clear distinction between students and coaches.  To a certain extent, coaching is a chosen profession; it's a job.  It may not pay much, but it does pay.  For someone who wants to improve their station in life (for their own benefit or the benefit of their family), I'm not as troubled by coaches seeking and accepting jobs at other schools, especially if the job is an upgrade (say, from WR coach to Offensive Coordinator).  That said, coaches that move around too much get earn a reputation that, at some point, comes back to haunt them. 

Does that kind of loyalty mean anything?  Of course it does.  I have tremendous respect for the coaches that devote the vast majority of their career to coaching and to coaching at one school.  Somebody like Earl Garcia at Hillsborough High School or  Bill Castle at Lakeland. 

Do those players that the coach is leaving behind , and now have to learn a new system as well as philosophy, mean anything?   This one's a double-edged sword for me.  A great coach (head or position) leaving a program sucks for the kids that are there when he leaves.  But, when the departure of a bad or even a so-so coach creates an opening for a young, new, dynamic coach to fill the void, then it becomes a win for the kids.  Arguably, kids who are exposed to multiple systems, coaches and/or philosophies have an advantage at the next level.   Interestingly, I saw a recent debate on social media regarding the question of whether high school coaches running a single wing or triple option offense are doing a disservice to their kids trying to get exposure at the collegiate level.   Good arguments on both sides of this debate (right Darter?).  

As far as 'leaving your brothers behind" how is that going to help a young man or woman who wants to have a chance at at college scholarship?   I assume you're talking about the guy who is leaving?  Again, I see both sides of this one.  One the one hand, if a really good player stays with a mediocre team, he has a tendency to stand out.  Sometimes, when those players transfer over to a school that already is loaded with talent, they don't have the opportunity to stand out nearly as much and can sometimes even be overlooked.    That said, as a parent, I would want my son to have a positive football experience - however you want to define positive.  Winning is a part of that, but does not define that.  There are a couple of schools in the Tampa Bay area that have struggled mightily over the last decade (Leto and Dunedin to name two).  If I had a football-playing son and my family was zoned for one of those schools, I likely would think long and hard about sending my kid to that school.  But, I would try to make that decision before my kid ever sets foot on campus, much less plays his first down for one of those schools.  In my mind, there's a difference between "never showing up" and "transferring." 

Do you think College Football coaches care about that?  This is a great question, Jambun.  My short answer is that some do and some don't and even those who say they do may not when push comes to shove.  I'm sure you've seen the Nick Saban clip where he talks about not wanting to recruit kids who transfer in high school (transfers that don't involve legitimate family moves).   You typically see the clips circulated around the day after Alabama offers a kid who has transferred twice in high school.   :P   Truth be told, I have have spoken with some coaches who see 'transferring' as a problem, as they perceive those kids will be the first kids to enter the portal when things don't go their way from the start.   My gut tells me that there are just as many, if not more coaches, that will say this, but then turn around and rationalize why they just offered that transferring kid a scholarship because, at the end of the day, the kid had 4 or 5-star talent. 

Do you think that is going to help him or her later on in life? Who knows.  The lessons learned on the field are just a part of the overall education of a kid.  So many other things come into play.  I can say without hesitation that kids carry with them for a lifetime the lessons they learn on the field, including leadership skills and traits like perseverance, determination, teamwork and even empathy.   

Venice might have been the second best team in the state of Florida for many years, but when they had to compete against the Ft. Lauderdale All-Star team in the 7A semifinals every year, what do you expect?    I expect the best  team in the state will win most of those games.   B)  

I understand your point about 'looking out for number one.'  I get that.  And I get the idea of looking out for your family.   Sometimes that requires making sacrifices and learning how to also look out for others. 

Jambun, at the end of the day, I would like to see high school sports - especially football - remain relevant and competitive.  In my mind, the idea that all the good players in a particular geographic area can all choose to play for the same high school, such that all the other area school are rendered meaningless, threatens the long-term existence of a sport that has so much to offer.  And, if all the "have-not schools" start shutting down their football programs, a lot of kids are going to miss out on an experience that can be so valuable for them in their future. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Perspective said:

Jambun, at the end of the day, I would like to see high school sports - especially football - remain relevant and competitive.  In my mind, the idea that all the good players in a particular geographic area can all choose to play for the same high school, such that all the other area school are rendered meaningless, threatens the long-term existence of a sport that has so much to offer.  And, if all the "have-not schools" start shutting down their football programs, a lot of kids are going to miss out on an experience that can be so valuable for them in their future. 

You said it all right there. It is all fine and dandy to appreciate the loaded teams that may play an epic state finals game. But at what cost? Numerous blowout victories during the regular season and through the first three or four games of the playoffs?

To be honest, I liked it better when talented, but obviously flawed teams would meet in the championship games. Just my two cents. 

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11 hours ago, FBGUY1989 said:

Everything you said is accurate but a lot of the talent live in those neighborhoods so it's not all transfers and those coaches you mentioned are legendary. Oh I see you mentioned Southridge but what's going on with them because they have fallen off.

That is my point. All the public schools in inner-cities are very close to each other so a lot of the players who play Pop Warner and youth football together attend the same school with the best coaches to try to have the most success in high school football. 

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9 hours ago, Perspective said:

Col. Jessup: You want answers?

Kaffee: I think I'm entitled to.

Col. Jessep: You want answers?

Kaffee: I WANT THE TRUTH!

Col. Jessup: YOU CAN'T HANDLE THE TRUTH!

Just a little levity to start things out.   But, I'll do my best to answer your questions, Jambun, because you typically raise good questions. 

All right, Perspective does your litmus test about "leaving your brothers behind" apply to coaches who change jobs every few years because another school has more talent and thus a better chance to win a state championship?   To be honest, I haven't seen much of this, especially at the head coach level.  But even for assistant coaches, I haven't seen much movement - at least not in the Tampa Bay area.   That said, I make a clear distinction between students and coaches.  To a certain extent, coaching is a chosen profession; it's a job.  It may not pay much, but it does pay.  For someone who wants to improve their station in life (for their own benefit or the benefit of their family), I'm not as troubled by coaches seeking and accepting jobs at other schools, especially if the job is an upgrade (say, from WR coach to Offensive Coordinator).  That said, coaches that move around too much get earn a reputation that, at some point, comes back to haunt them. 

Does that kind of loyalty mean anything?  Of course it does.  I have tremendous respect for the coaches that devote the vast majority of their career to coaching and to coaching at one school.  Somebody like Earl Garcia at Hillsborough High School or  Bill Castle at Lakeland. 

Do those players that the coach is leaving behind , and now have to learn a new system as well as philosophy, mean anything?   This one's a double-edged sword for me.  A great coach (head or position) leaving a program sucks for the kids that are there when he leaves.  But, when the departure of a bad or even a so-so coach creates an opening for a young, new, dynamic coach to fill the void, then it becomes a win for the kids.  Arguably, kids who are exposed to multiple systems, coaches and/or philosophies have an advantage at the next level.   Interestingly, I saw a recent debate on social media regarding the question of whether high school coaches running a single wing or triple option offense are doing a disservice to their kids trying to get exposure at the collegiate level.   Good arguments on both sides of this debate (right Darter?).  

As far as 'leaving your brothers behind" how is that going to help a young man or woman who wants to have a chance at at college scholarship?   I assume you're talking about the guy who is leaving?  Again, I see both sides of this one.  One the one hand, if a really good player stays with a mediocre team, he has a tendency to stand out.  Sometimes, when those players transfer over to a school that already is loaded with talent, they don't have the opportunity to stand out nearly as much and can sometimes even be overlooked.    That said, as a parent, I would want my son to have a positive football experience - however you want to define positive.  Winning is a part of that, but does not define that.  There are a couple of schools in the Tampa Bay area that have struggled mightily over the last decade (Leto and Dunedin to name two).  If I had a football-playing son and my family was zoned for one of those schools, I likely would think long and hard about sending my kid to that school.  But, I would try to make that decision before my kid ever sets foot on campus, much less plays his first down for one of those schools.  In my mind, there's a difference between "never showing up" and "transferring." 

Do you think College Football coaches care about that?  This is a great question, Jambun.  My short answer is that some do and some don't and even those who say they do may not when push comes to shove.  I'm sure you've seen the Nick Saban clip where he talks about not wanting to recruit kids who transfer in high school (transfers that don't involve legitimate family moves).   You typically see the clips circulated around the day after Alabama offers a kid who has transferred twice in high school.   :P   Truth be told, I have have spoken with some coaches who see 'transferring' as a problem, as they perceive those kids will be the first kids to enter the portal when things don't go their way from the start.   My gut tells me that there are just as many, if not more coaches, that will say this, but then turn around and rationalize why they just offered that transferring kid a scholarship because, at the end of the day, the kid had 4 or 5-star talent. 

Do you think that is going to help him or her later on in life? Who knows.  The lessons learned on the field are just a part of the overall education of a kid.  So many other things come into play.  I can say without hesitation that kids carry with them for a lifetime the lessons they learn on the field, including leadership skills and traits like perseverance, determination, teamwork and even empathy.   

Venice might have been the second best team in the state of Florida for many years, but when they had to compete against the Ft. Lauderdale All-Star team in the 7A semifinals every year, what do you expect?    I expect the best  team in the state will win most of those games.   B)  

I understand your point about 'looking out for number one.'  I get that.  And I get the idea of looking out for your family.   Sometimes that requires making sacrifices and learning how to also look out for others. 

Jambun, at the end of the day, I would like to see high school sports - especially football - remain relevant and competitive.  In my mind, the idea that all the good players in a particular geographic area can all choose to play for the same high school, such that all the other area school are rendered meaningless, threatens the long-term existence of a sport that has so much to offer.  And, if all the "have-not schools" start shutting down their football programs, a lot of kids are going to miss out on an experience that can be so valuable for them in their future. 

 

 

The have schools can play each other in districts and classifications, and the have-not schools can play each other in districts and classifications. A formula can be developed to determine that districts and classifications. As far as the other points, I think that I am going to send you a private message so we can talk on the phone. I don't enjoy typing that much, and we can possibly talk about this further.  

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12 hours ago, Jambun82 said:

The have schools can play each other in districts and classifications, and the have-not schools can play each other in districts and classifications. A formula can be developed to determine that districts and classifications. As far as the other points, I think that I am going to send you a private message so we can talk on the phone. I don't enjoy typing that much, and we can possibly talk about this further.  

I was actually thinking about something along those same lines . . . in much the same way that Counties have magnet schools for certain things (like music/arts), what if each County could have one public high school that was dedicated to sports (or just football).  That one school would be allowed to recruit. Perhaps the coaches would be paid better.  They would, in turn, play the other football magnet schools in nearby counties.   In essence, you would create county all-star teams from the get-go that would practice with each other all season instead of one week before a meaningless game after the season is over.  All of the Magnet Football schools would compete for their own state title, while all the other schools throughout the state would continue to play by "no recruiting/limited transfer" rules for their own state championships.  

I haven't really given this much thought . . . just an idea that floated into my brain and didn't immediately depart.  

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11 hours ago, Jambun82 said:

That is my point. All the public schools in inner-cities are very close to each other so a lot of the players who play Pop Warner and youth football together attend the same school with the best coaches to try to have the most success in high school football. 

You right cause in Miami you have neighborhood's like Liberty City which has school's like Northwestern and Central but then go down you have Jackson across 95 you have Edison then go down you have Booker T. Washington which a lot of these kids no each other. 

Down South is the same way. Neighborhood's like Coconut Grove, Perrine, Richmond Heights, Goulds and Naranja are close by so the kids from Coral Gables, Killian and Palmetto all know each other. Giving a little knowledge on Miami if I can

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2 hours ago, Perspective said:

I was actually thinking about something along those same lines . . . in much the same way that Counties have magnet schools for certain things (like music/arts), what if each County could have one public high school that was dedicated to sports (or just football).  That one school would be allowed to recruit. Perhaps the coaches would be paid better.  They would, in turn, play the other football magnet schools in nearby counties.   In essence, you would create county all-star teams from the get-go that would practice with each other all season instead of one week before a meaningless game after the season is over.  All of the Magnet Football schools would compete for their own state title, while all the other schools throughout the state would continue to play by "no recruiting/limited transfer" rules for their own state championships.  

I haven't really given this much thought . . . just an idea that floated into my brain and didn't immediately depart.  

And what self-respecting school and athletic department wants to be considered a "have not"? :lol: I don't think it would ever pass the smell test' but you're thinking outside the box; that's good. 

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38 minutes ago, HornetFan said:

And what self-respecting school and athletic department wants to be considered a "have not"? :lol: I don't think it would ever pass the smell test' but you're thinking outside the box; that's good. 

And something like this could probably only work, if at all, with the larger counties.

Although I'd love to see the look on Jesse's face when the Madison County District School Board designates James Madison Preparatory High School (the only other public high school in the County other than Madison Co. H.S.) as the Magnet Football School.  :P

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10 hours ago, HornetFan said:

And what self-respecting school and athletic department wants to be considered a "have not"? :lol: I don't think it would ever pass the smell test' but you're thinking outside the box; that's good. 

I have get news for you, Mr-Doesn't-Know-As-Much-As-He -Thinks. Most Athletic Directors and Coaches who work at schools with lesser talent and considered "non-football-schools" would gladly play teams of equal strength and talent. These schools would not be called "have-not" teams obviously.  I do believe that it would help some of these programs as they could build confidence and more children in the school would try out for football if some of the teams could develop winning records. Not many people would focus on the strength-of-schedule, they would be excited about their school winning more games then previous years. A program could always move up classifications if the program is dominant at this "lower" level. This system is in place in several states already. 

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13 hours ago, Perspective said:

I was actually thinking about something along those same lines . . . in much the same way that Counties have magnet schools for certain things (like music/arts), what if each County could have one public high school that was dedicated to sports (or just football).  That one school would be allowed to recruit. Perhaps the coaches would be paid better.  They would, in turn, play the other football magnet schools in nearby counties.   In essence, you would create county all-star teams from the get-go that would practice with each other all season instead of one week before a meaningless game after the season is over.  All of the Magnet Football schools would compete for their own state title, while all the other schools throughout the state would continue to play by "no recruiting/limited transfer" rules for their own state championships.  

I haven't really given this much thought . . . just an idea that floated into my brain and didn't immediately depart.  

Perspective, we have that in common. My brain never stops as well. I am always thinking! lol 

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2 hours ago, Jambun82 said:

I have get news for you, Mr-Doesn't-Know-As-Much-As-He -Thinks. Most Athletic Directors and Coaches who work at schools with lesser talent and considered "non-football-schools" would gladly play teams of equal strength and talent. These schools would not be called "have-not" teams obviously.  I do believe that it would help some of these programs as they could build confidence and more children in the school would try out for football if some of the teams could develop winning records. Not many people would focus on the strength-of-schedule, they would be excited about their school winning more games then previous years. A program could always move up classifications if the program is dominant at this "lower" level. This system is in place in several states already. 

That's exactly what Satellite did and they were pretty competitive last season albeit in the D2 Brevard division but they did also defeat Merritt Island along with teams that usually destroyed them. Now they will be back in a district competing against Merritt Island, Rockledge, Palm Bay, Bayside and Titusville.

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11 hours ago, Jambun82 said:

I have get news for you, Mr-Doesn't-Know-As-Much-As-He -Thinks. Most Athletic Directors and Coaches who work at schools with lesser talent and considered "non-football-schools" would gladly play teams of equal strength and talent. These schools would not be called "have-not" teams obviously.  I do believe that it would help some of these programs as they could build confidence and more children in the school would try out for football if some of the teams could develop winning records. Not many people would focus on the strength-of-schedule, they would be excited about their school winning more games then previous years. A program could always move up classifications if the program is dominant at this "lower" level. This system is in place in several states already. 

I thought there was already a way to do this; go independent.

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With season around the corner, anyone on Forum hear how Covid resurgence might affect football again?  Like everyone else, was sure hoping to put this behind us but it doesn't look like that is where we are headed.

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13 minutes ago, Ray Icaza said:

With season around the corner, anyone on Forum hear how Covid resurgence might affect football again?  Like everyone else, was sure hoping to put this behind us but it doesn't look like that is where we are headed.

Absolutely nothing

 

This isn't spring sports which the state doesn't give a damn about (even though I'm sure some people will say "they do care" and those people are liars just like the people running this state)

 

Football played last year at THE PEAK of the infection numbers while spring sports in 2020 got shafted 

 

They will play football even if they had to mandate statewide to not allow fans (worst case scenario) 

 

The governor is a big football fan so he won't allow that sport to get shafted no matter how bad covid gets 

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9 minutes ago, ColumbiaHighFan2017class said:

Absolutely nothing

 

This isn't spring sports which the state doesn't give a damn about (even though I'm sure some people will say "they do care" and those people are liars just like the people running this state)

 

Football played last year at THE PEAK of the infection numbers while spring sports in 2020 got shafted 

 

They will play football even if they had to mandate statewide to not allow fans (worst case scenario) 

 

The governor is a big football fan so he won't allow that sport to get shafted no matter how bad covid gets 

The Governor had kept the state open, for the most part, for over a year unlike many other states that locked down everything. Abiding by the Constitution he did leave it up to private enterprise to decide how they wanted to handle the situation. It is against Florida law to require vaccinations and other protocols from private citizens in order to go about their daily business. Only Doctor's Offices, Clinics, and Hospitals require masks in order to be treated. If games were stopped, due to Covid, it was the high school administration that did it. Not the Governor. I might remind you that Florida had fewer cases of Covid per capita than either New York or California that both locked down tighter than a drum for over a year.  

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13 minutes ago, ColumbiaHighFan2017class said:

Absolutely nothing

 

This isn't spring sports which the state doesn't give a damn about (even though I'm sure some people will say "they do care" and those people are liars just like the people running this state)

 

Football played last year at THE PEAK of the infection numbers while spring sports in 2020 got shafted 

 

They will play football even if they had to mandate statewide to not allow fans (worst case scenario) 

 

The governor is a big football fan so he won't allow that sport to get shafted no matter how bad covid gets 

Different policies in different counties.  Although Orange and Osceola are both blue, their protocols were different leading to game cancellations in Orange but not so much in Osceola;  deSantis had nothing to do with that.  Plus playing in THE PEAK last year, how many football players were lost to Covid?  Policies are driven by the areas beliefs, not politicians.   In college, most of the power 5 conferences were cancelling one after another until the SEC step up and said no way.  Then slowly, conferences in blue areas had to change policies as players, parents, coaches and fans demanded it.  Alabama played 13 games, Ohio State 8.

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1 minute ago, Ray Icaza said:

Different policies in different counties.  Although Orange and Osceola are both blue, their protocols were different leading to game cancellations in Orange but not so much in Osceola;  deSantis had nothing to do with that.  Plus playing in THE PEAK last year, how many football players were lost to Covid?  Policies are driven by the areas beliefs, not politicians.   In college, most of the power 5 conferences were cancelling one after another until the SEC step up and said no way.  Then slowly, conferences in blue areas had to change policies as players, parents, coaches and fans demanded it.  Alabama played 13 games, Ohio State 8.

Idk about players but we had a football coach who died from COVID-19 and that's probably why Columbia county had both football head coaches pushing to delay our start as we were probably the only rural north Florida county to do so

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