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skyway

Jambun etc, assess this penalty call by the officials

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23 hours ago, HornetFan said:

As a long time football fan and season ticket holder to several pro and college football teams during my life, I have always believed that officials should establish early what will and will not be tolerated and then let the players play provided they don't get out of hand. A block in the back can be as little as a slight push or as bad as wiping a player out from behind; I don't believe a slight push should be called. It's like pass interference; too often officials determine who wins a game by not allowing any contact by CB's. It's football, not soccer.

HornetFan, I didn't mean to be rude, but a foul is ALWAYS at the discretion of the officials, that is what the officials role is in a football game. Also, Pro, and College Football Officiating  cannot be compared to High School Football Officiating. The objectives are often different when comparing players who play for a living or on scholarship with teenage children many of whom will never play beyond this level.

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22 hours ago, skyway said:

If you watch the last clip, at 0:50, you get a much better view. The other WR is not in position to do anything. And, we can easily see when and where the official threw the flag. It was obviously on #10. And, it was obviously b.s. Although not nearly as b.s. as the roughing the punter call towards the end of the 1st half, or a couple of the roughing the passer calls. 

All right, thank you skyway.

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11 hours ago, badbird said:

looks like a block in the back to me.  Pause it at 59 seconds and his hands are on his back.  

 

They could have also called a hold on the slot WR.  His hands are clearly outside and his left hand is on his back.

Yes, I see what you mean on both counts badbird.

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12 hours ago, badbird said:

looks like a block in the back to me.  Pause it at 59 seconds and his hands are on his back.  

 

They could have also called a hold on the slot WR.  His hands are clearly outside and his left hand is on his back.

You have to pause it, because the hands were there for such a tiny amount of time. It was a joke of a call. But, when the first inclination is either to defend the officials, or hate on Lakeland because of the transfers, it's easy to see why the reaction is what it is. 

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Skyway, this whole thread seems a little bit like when my wife makes up her mind about something she wants to do, then asks me what I want to do, and then gets mad at me for giving her an answer that's different from the one she had in her head the whole time.  :P

As a man who has fathered three sons who played or play receiver in high school, I can understand why you might think the referee could have ignored the block in the back penalty on number 10.  As I mentioned above, the illegal block  really didn't adversely affect the play.  However, even at the high school level, the action happens quickly.  The ref appears to be looking right in the direction of the WR at the exact time the WR puts his hands on the back of the DB and extends his arms -- which basically meets the textbook definition of an illegal block in the back.   As the son of a former high school official, I can certainly understand why the ref reacted the way he did and why he threw the flag.  It's just that simple. 

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