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Joshua Wilson

RPI for football in FHSAA is official

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16 minutes ago, gatorman-uf said:

The important part of that story is buried at the end.

"In New Jersey, nearly 1,700 fewer players participated in football in 2017 than in 2016, according to the National Federation of High School Associations’ annual participation survey. The decline of nearly 7 percent dropped New Jersey’s total number of participants to 23,034, the lowest since the state had 24,144 football players in 2003."

This has to be concerning overall for all of football and all sports actually. Professional team owners, professional athletes, coaches, communities have to do more to make kids interested in football/sports as a whole. If they don't, the sport will die. (See baseball). 

Umm baseball is still around you know LMAO

 

It just doesn't have the same national popularity it once did but it is far from being "dead"

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8 minutes ago, ColumbiaHighFan2017class said:

Umm baseball is still around you know LMAO

It just doesn't have the same national popularity it once did but it is far from being "dead"

No baseball isn't dead, but it definitely is dying. Baseball no longer commands national attention (barely the World Series outside of the two markets). Even a game against two great teams late in the season barely makes a blip on the national radar. The sport is dying (just like NASCAR and Golf). And sports in general are dying, the audiences are trending older and older and the number of youth players is shrinking and even the interest in sports in general is shrinking by the average fan.

Today's average teenager knows and cares less about sports than they did 10 years ago or 20 years ago. Ask any person in marketing and advertising, you need to get them young. We as a society aren't doing that. Sports are no longer something done for "fun" but rather a lifelong commitment that turns off the average person from playing. Go look at the Little League fields in baseball and watch how many kids play just for fun vs how many kids play so that they can play on the travel teams. At some point, we have to make people fans of the game or the game will die. Baseball, golf, NASCAR all of their audiences are trending up in age. Soon it will become too expensive for the average family to attend a game and too expensive for the average family to participate in the sport for fun.

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30 minutes ago, gatorman-uf said:

The important part of that story is buried at the end.

"In New Jersey, nearly 1,700 fewer players participated in football in 2017 than in 2016, according to the National Federation of High School Associations’ annual participation survey. The decline of nearly 7 percent dropped New Jersey’s total number of participants to 23,034, the lowest since the state had 24,144 football players in 2003."

This has to be concerning overall for all of football and all sports actually. Professional team owners, professional athletes, coaches, communities have to do more to make kids interested in football/sports as a whole. If they don't, the sport will die. (See baseball). 

We are knocking ourselves out, squabbling over which playoff system to use, while the house is on fire.  This is not just happening in New Jersey.  Illinois' participation is down 17% over a few years.  We should be worried about the programs whose numbers are declining and/or who struggle to even be competitive.  Our focus is in the wrong place.       

 

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15 minutes ago, gatorman-uf said:

No baseball isn't dead, but it definitely is dying. Baseball no longer commands national attention (barely the World Series outside of the two markets). Even a game against two great teams late in the season barely makes a blip on the national radar. The sport is dying (just like NASCAR and Golf). And sports in general are dying, the audiences are trending older and older and the number of youth players is shrinking and even the interest in sports in general is shrinking by the average fan.

Today's average teenager knows and cares less about sports than they did 10 years ago or 20 years ago. Ask any person in marketing and advertising, you need to get them young. We as a society aren't doing that. Sports are no longer something done for "fun" but rather a lifelong commitment that turns off the average person from playing. Go look at the Little League fields in baseball and watch how many kids play just for fun vs how many kids play so that they can play on the travel teams. At some point, we have to make people fans of the game or the game will die. Baseball, golf, NASCAR all of their audiences are trending up in age. Soon it will become too expensive for the average family to attend a game and too expensive for the average family to participate in the sport for fun.

The RPI is a prime example of our problem in sports.  Everything has to be taken to an extreme.  Nothing is "good enough."  Now one needs a computer and a PhD to be a coach.   I can only imagine where we will be in 10 years after the "experts" have made multiple revisions to the RPI in their fanatical quest for perfection.  We're not designing a nuclear reactor, folks.  We're talking about a game with a funny-lookin ball. 

The average high school football player that made the game great over the years was always just that...average...just another kid...a kid who played for the fun of it and didn't want things too complicated because he had other priorities in his life.  We've made high school sports bigger than life.  That's fine for the superstar athletes and the hardcore junkies like us...but it's a turnoff for the average kid and average parent.  And there are a LOT more of them than the former.  Not everyone wants life that complicated and intense...nor is that level of intensity always healthy.  

Are all of the wondrous improvements in sports today (like RPI systems), making kids truly happy...or just more stressed out?  Check out the stats on teen depression and suicide for the answer.  More than ever, kids and adults today need less complexity in their lives.  Our focus should be on the happiness of our kids in sports, not our obsessions as adults.  Some of what I see today seems like an OCD exercise by folks with too much time on their hands to think about the next best mousetrap.     

 

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