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Looks as Though Football is a Go for this Season


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56 minutes ago, ColumbiaHighFan2017class said:

 

Welcome to the adult world in 2020. The decision is partly based on national politics. I hope to God there are no major outbreaks in the public or for that matter, private schools. I am not optimistic particularly in the larger metro areas of: South Florida, Tampa, Orlando, Tallahassee. I am sure some entire schools will be overrun with the virus and will have to shut down at least temporarily. 

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Even if the numbers are inflated the numbers are far higher than they were back in the spring when the state said screw the seniors and screw the spring athletes but now that it's football time it's suddenly safe, bullcrap!

 

At this point I don't care if there is a season as I may just decide that I'll just stay home, I'm not gonna support this double standard crap  

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1 hour ago, ColumbiaHighFan2017class said:

Even if the numbers are inflated the numbers are far higher than they were back in the spring when the state said screw the seniors and screw the spring athletes but now that it's football time it's suddenly safe, bullcrap!

 

At this point I don't care if there is a season as I may just decide that I'll just stay home, I'm not gonna support this double standard crap  

lol do you think they are reopening because of football and shut down because it was baseball/softball?

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6 minutes ago, badbird said:

lol do you think they are reopening because of football and shut down because it was baseball/softball?

Of course. It was a conspiracy to shut down Spring Sports (although the season was right in the midst of Covid-19) and now it's another conspiracy to open up Fall Sports. Hmmmmmmmmmmm. ( the actual death rates per capita right now are the lowest they have been since the start of Covid-19. Death rates per capita mean how many deaths there are measured against how many people are tested. Simple analytical mathematics. Very few people were being tested in April and May so death rates per capita were high. Since millions have been tested since per capita death rates have fallen drastically. In fact I heard yesterday that they have fallen below what the CDC considers a concern for a Pandemic). Let the games begin.

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3 minutes ago, Proseteye said:

Of course. It was a conspiracy to shut down Spring Sports (although the season was right in the midst of Covid-19) and now it's another conspiracy to open up Fall Sports. Hmmmmmmmmmmm. ( the actual death rates per capita right now are the lowest they have been since the start of Covid-19. Death rates per capita mean how many deaths there are measured against how many people are tested. Simple analytical mathematics. Very few people were being tested in April and May so death rates per capita were high. Since millions have been tested since per capita death rates have fallen drastically. In fact I heard yesterday that they have fallen below what the CDC considers a concern for a Pandemic). Let the games begin.

So the death rates are the only numbers that matter?

 

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That is the measurement the CDC goes by when they evaluate how serious a disease is. With the common flu, which comes around like clockwork every winter in the US, there are approximately 70,000 deaths and 300,000 hospitalizations. But, there is no hysteria, no panic, no country lock down, no economy destroyed every winter because the amount of cases is 40 million or more. The death rate is lower than people falling off bicycles every year (sarcasm). Why don't we shut down the country for Cancer deaths which are 607,000 per year? Cancer is caused by a virus which mutates cells and eventually kills the host. 84,000 died of pneumonia which is caused by a virus.  More people die from illegal drugs than from Covid-19. Where is the concern?

 

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No offense to the scientists on board, but I'm going to try to get this back on the football track. 

So, let's all pretend that there's going to be high school football in the fall.  Before it happens and before it happens to a particular school or county (such that we might have a predisposed bias one way or the other), let's address a few questions.  Assume fall practice has started up and perhaps the season already has started:

1.  What happens when a single member of a team tests positive? He could be a starter or he could be a bench-warmer; does it matter?   What should a school do?  Quarantine the kid?  Require all members of the team (and coaches) to self-quarantine for a specified period of time?  How long?  One week?  Two weeks?  Realizing of course, that each week off likely will cost the team a game. 

2.  If you don't require the whole team to be quarantined (but only the single player who tested positive), aren't you now subjecting the next opponent to exposure of the virus -- perhaps through asymptomatic players?  Of course, that's always going to be a risk, but the risk increases with a known positive result.   Assuming some form of team quarantine, what effect does that have on the next game or two?  Do those opponents get Covid forfeit wins? 

3.  What if there are multiple teams in a particular geographic area that are forced to take a week or two off?  Can or must "clean teams" in that area play each other instead of getting a Covid forfeit win?   Absent an agreement, perhaps the clean teams would have to be within 2 or 3 classifications of each other, so that a 2A team doesn't get matched up against an 8A team . . . unless the 2A team is Madison. :D

4.  Or, how about this:  put someone at the FHSAA in charge of 'last minute scheduling.'   Say by 3:00 on Wednesday, the last-minute scheduler knows who all the virus teams are and who all the clean teams are, who was supposed to be playing who, who had a home game scheduled and who was supposed to be on the road.  The scheduler then matches up the clean teams against each other (based on size, location, etc.), allowing home teams to keep home games as much as possible for both the gate receipts and referee scheduling. 

5.  Should Covid forfeit losses count against team RPI's?  Going from 10 games to 8 probably wouldn't be a problem, but what if the virus hits again and a team loses two more games to the virus?  Could a team qualify for the playoffs having only played six games?

6.  Speaking of the playoffs, what happens if Covid hits then?   At this point, I'm guessing the clean team gets a bye and the team with the virus, well, their season is over.  

7.  What happens if a team tries to hide the fact that their 3rd team long-snapper, son of a prominent booster had tested positive prior to a game, but the team chose to keep quiet?  What should the punishment be?  Fines?  Suspensions?  Death penalty . . . at least for the rest of the season? 

I'm curious what your answers are to these questions, but regardless, someone needs to start thinking about these questions (and more) now.  FHSAA Task Force, are you out there?  

 

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7 minutes ago, Proseteye said:

That is the measurement the CDC goes by when they evaluate how serious a disease is. With the common flu, which comes around like clockwork every winter in the US, there are approximately 70,000 deaths and 300,000 hospitalizations. But, there is no hysteria, no panic, no country lock down, no economy destroyed every winter because the amount of cases is 40 million or more. The death rate is lower than people falling off bicycles every year (sarcasm). Why don't we shut down the country for Cancer deaths which are 607,000 per year? Cancer is caused by a virus which mutates cells and eventually kills the host. 84,000 died of pneumonia which is caused by a virus.  More people die from illegal drugs than from Covid-19. Where is the concern?

 

The concern is there is no way to treat Covid

No vaccine, no proven antibiotics that fights it

 

They tell you quarantine for 14 days and hope for the best and that's good enough for you?

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15 minutes ago, ColumbiaHighFan2017class said:

The concern is there is no way to treat Covid

No vaccine, no proven antibiotics that fights it

 

They tell you quarantine for 14 days and hope for the best and that's good enough for you?

The body's natural immune system protects from and fights off viruses. There is no cure for any virus and there is only one vaccine and that is somewhat effective and its only for the common flu. It's supposedly 40% effective but nobody really knows. Vaccines are made up of Antibodies that help to boost your Immune System if it is compromised. Other than that a vaccine does not do much good. Every day that you're alive you are bombarded by millions of viruses which the immune system protects against. The fact that millions of people have had Covid-19 with no ill affect or only mild symptoms is proof that very few people die. Most that die have other severe medical problems wherein their immune systems are compromised. Antibiotics can only kill Bacteria. They are useless against viruses. Once again, the immune system is the only thing that protects against viruses. If you are healthy, exercise regularly, eat right, don't smoke, take drugs, or drink excessively, then your immune system will never allow a virus to affect you. I would say that HS football players fall into that category and the reason why people under 60 do not have much to worry about from Covid-19 or any virus.

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2 hours ago, Proseteye said:

That is the measurement the CDC goes by when they evaluate how serious a disease is. With the common flu, which comes around like clockwork every winter in the US, there are approximately 70,000 deaths and 300,000 hospitalizations. But, there is no hysteria, no panic, no country lock down, no economy destroyed every winter because the amount of cases is 40 million or more. The death rate is lower than people falling off bicycles every year (sarcasm). Why don't we shut down the country for Cancer deaths which are 607,000 per year? Cancer is caused by a virus which mutates cells and eventually kills the host. 84,000 died of pneumonia which is caused by a virus.  More people die from illegal drugs than from Covid-19. Where is the concern?

 

  Your entire post is laughable. The reason why Covid is a big deal is because it is a new virus that is far stronger than the flu has ever been, and is killing more people in a shorter amount of time. We have a vaccine against the flu that has been around for decades and is proven to work against the most common strands. Florida as it stands right now is closing in on 4,000 deaths and 215,000 cases, which is a crisis and one that can’t be taken lightly. Also, we don’t shut down for the flu, because asymptomatic people don’t have the same capacity to spread the flu virus as we do with Covid-19. And cancer isn’t spread like viruses are, and generally affect the older population and those who expose themself to radiation. 

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2 hours ago, VeniceIndiansFootball said:

  Your entire post is laughable. The reason why Covid is a big deal is because it is a new virus that is far stronger than the flu has ever been, and is killing more people in a shorter amount of time. We have a vaccine against the flu that has been around for decades and is proven to work against the most common strands. Florida as it stands right now is closing in on 4,000 deaths and 215,000 cases, which is a crisis and one that can’t be taken lightly. Also, we don’t shut down for the flu, because asymptomatic people don’t have the same capacity to spread the flu virus as we do with Covid-19. And cancer isn’t spread like viruses are, and generally affect the older population and those who expose themself to radiation. 

Also, The Flu only kills about 35,000 people a year in the US. 2 years ago we had the highest total in 40 years and hit the 70,000 people keep using.  That is double the norm.  

Broward superintendent came out right away after mandate and said starting 5 days a week isn't likely in Broward.

 As for football, Broward just pushed back summer workouts again to the 20th.  That is likely to be moved as well.  If the FHSAA really pushes forward with the start of the season on time or even back 2 weeks don't be surprised if South Florida (outside of maybe large private schools) pulls out of FHSAA and does their own thing this year. It has been discussed.

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3 hours ago, VeniceIndiansFootball said:

  Your entire post is laughable. The reason why Covid is a big deal is because it is a new virus that is far stronger than the flu has ever been, and is killing more people in a shorter amount of time. We have a vaccine against the flu that has been around for decades and is proven to work against the most common strands. Florida as it stands right now is closing in on 4,000 deaths and 215,000 cases, which is a crisis and one that can’t be taken lightly. Also, we don’t shut down for the flu, because asymptomatic people don’t have the same capacity to spread the flu virus as we do with Covid-19. And cancer isn’t spread like viruses are, and generally affect the older population and those who expose themself to radiation. 

Proset is clearly an idiot with an ideological bias and should be ignored. You will gain nothing arguing with a fool!

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3 hours ago, blystr2002 said:

Also, The Flu only kills about 35,000 people a year in the US. 2 years ago we had the highest total in 40 years and hit the 70,000 people keep using.  That is double the norm.  

Broward superintendent came out right away after mandate and said starting 5 days a week isn't likely in Broward.

 As for football, Broward just pushed back summer workouts again to the 20th.  That is likely to be moved as well.  If the FHSAA really pushes forward with the start of the season on time or even back 2 weeks don't be surprised if South Florida (outside of maybe large private schools) pulls out of FHSAA and does their own thing this year. It has been discussed.

I’m interested in how schools whose players come back positive and drop out of the FHSAA will decide to handle the 2021 season as well. It’s a year away, but if the pandemic is still around then, how would they restart their schedule? I believe that this pandemic will in some way change the way football at the high school level is played. I wouldn’t know about the flu 40 years ago because I’m only in my 20s, but I would assume that a long term crisis could have lasting affects on football, if not some permanent changes.

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20 minutes ago, VeniceIndiansFootball said:

I’m interested in how schools whose players come back positive and drop out of the FHSAA will decide to handle the 2021 season as well. It’s a year away, but if the pandemic is still around then, how would they restart their schedule? I believe that this pandemic will in some way change the way football at the high school level is played. I wouldn’t know about the flu 40 years ago because I’m only in my 20s, but I would assume that a long term crisis could have lasting affects on football, if not some permanent changes.

Not sure, but Miami-Dade, Palm Beach and Broward make up what 35-40 percent of the schools in FHSAA football wise. That is a big chunk.  I am not talking just dropping out because of positive tests. I mean a Tri-County League has been mentioned. All teams from the counties from the start if rest of the state starts on time.  Again that is extreme last resort, but it has been mentioned.  Same with just doing individual county leagues has been mentioned down here.  As for if just this year or carry over to next would depend on a lot with the virus situation. South Florida 100% will not be ready to go July 27th that is for sure.

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18 hours ago, Perspective said:

No offense to the scientists on board, but I'm going to try to get this back on the football track. 

So, let's all pretend that there's going to be high school football in the fall.  Before it happens and before it happens to a particular school or county (such that we might have a predisposed bias one way or the other), let's address a few questions.  Assume fall practice has started up and perhaps the season already has started:

1.  What happens when a single member of a team tests positive? He could be a starter or he could be a bench-warmer; does it matter?   What should a school do?  Quarantine the kid?  Require all members of the team (and coaches) to self-quarantine for a specified period of time?  How long?  One week?  Two weeks?  Realizing of course, that each week off likely will cost the team a game. 

2.  If you don't require the whole team to be quarantined (but only the single player who tested positive), aren't you now subjecting the next opponent to exposure of the virus -- perhaps through asymptomatic players?  Of course, that's always going to be a risk, but the risk increases with a known positive result.   Assuming some form of team quarantine, what effect does that have on the next game or two?  Do those opponents get Covid forfeit wins? 

3.  What if there are multiple teams in a particular geographic area that are forced to take a week or two off?  Can or must "clean teams" in that area play each other instead of getting a Covid forfeit win?   Absent an agreement, perhaps the clean teams would have to be within 2 or 3 classifications of each other, so that a 2A team doesn't get matched up against an 8A team . . . unless the 2A team is Madison. :D

4.  Or, how about this:  put someone at the FHSAA in charge of 'last minute scheduling.'   Say by 3:00 on Wednesday, the last-minute scheduler knows who all the virus teams are and who all the clean teams are, who was supposed to be playing who, who had a home game scheduled and who was supposed to be on the road.  The scheduler then matches up the clean teams against each other (based on size, location, etc.), allowing home teams to keep home games as much as possible for both the gate receipts and referee scheduling. 

5.  Should Covid forfeit losses count against team RPI's?  Going from 10 games to 8 probably wouldn't be a problem, but what if the virus hits again and a team loses two more games to the virus?  Could a team qualify for the playoffs having only played six games?

6.  Speaking of the playoffs, what happens if Covid hits then?   At this point, I'm guessing the clean team gets a bye and the team with the virus, well, their season is over.  

7.  What happens if a team tries to hide the fact that their 3rd team long-snapper, son of a prominent booster had tested positive prior to a game, but the team chose to keep quiet?  What should the punishment be?  Fines?  Suspensions?  Death penalty . . . at least for the rest of the season? 

I'm curious what your answers are to these questions, but regardless, someone needs to start thinking about these questions (and more) now.  FHSAA Task Force, are you out there?  

 

In 2007 there was a outbreak of MRSA among several area teams. Hardee in particular had several players diagnosed with it.  There was no quarantine that I recall nor any cancellation of games.

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4 hours ago, Hwy17 said:

In 2007 there was a outbreak of MRSA among several area teams. Hardee in particular had several players diagnosed with it.  There was no quarantine that I recall nor any cancellation of games.

 

23 hours ago, Perspective said:

No offense to the scientists on board, but I'm going to try to get this back on the football track. 

So, let's all pretend that there's going to be high school football in the fall.  Before it happens and before it happens to a particular school or county (such that we might have a predisposed bias one way or the other), let's address a few questions.  Assume fall practice has started up and perhaps the season already has started:

1.  What happens when a single member of a team tests positive? He could be a starter or he could be a bench-warmer; does it matter?   What should a school do?  Quarantine the kid?  Require all members of the team (and coaches) to self-quarantine for a specified period of time?  How long?  One week?  Two weeks?  Realizing of course, that each week off likely will cost the team a game. 

2.  If you don't require the whole team to be quarantined (but only the single player who tested positive), aren't you now subjecting the next opponent to exposure of the virus -- perhaps through asymptomatic players?  Of course, that's always going to be a risk, but the risk increases with a known positive result.   Assuming some form of team quarantine, what effect does that have on the next game or two?  Do those opponents get Covid forfeit wins? 

3.  What if there are multiple teams in a particular geographic area that are forced to take a week or two off?  Can or must "clean teams" in that area play each other instead of getting a Covid forfeit win?   Absent an agreement, perhaps the clean teams would have to be within 2 or 3 classifications of each other, so that a 2A team doesn't get matched up against an 8A team . . . unless the 2A team is Madison. :D

4.  Or, how about this:  put someone at the FHSAA in charge of 'last minute scheduling.'   Say by 3:00 on Wednesday, the last-minute scheduler knows who all the virus teams are and who all the clean teams are, who was supposed to be playing who, who had a home game scheduled and who was supposed to be on the road.  The scheduler then matches up the clean teams against each other (based on size, location, etc.), allowing home teams to keep home games as much as possible for both the gate receipts and referee scheduling. 

5.  Should Covid forfeit losses count against team RPI's?  Going from 10 games to 8 probably wouldn't be a problem, but what if the virus hits again and a team loses two more games to the virus?  Could a team qualify for the playoffs having only played six games?

6.  Speaking of the playoffs, what happens if Covid hits then?   At this point, I'm guessing the clean team gets a bye and the team with the virus, well, their season is over.  

7.  What happens if a team tries to hide the fact that their 3rd team long-snapper, son of a prominent booster had tested positive prior to a game, but the team chose to keep quiet?  What should the punishment be?  Fines?  Suspensions?  Death penalty . . . at least for the rest of the season? 

I'm curious what your answers are to these questions, but regardless, someone needs to start thinking about these questions (and more) now.  FHSAA Task Force, are you out there?  

 

Why you say madison 

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16 hours ago, blystr2002 said:

Not sure, but Miami-Dade, Palm Beach and Broward make up what 35-40 percent of the schools in FHSAA football wise. That is a big chunk.  I am not talking just dropping out because of positive tests. I mean a Tri-County League has been mentioned. All teams from the counties from the start if rest of the state starts on time.  Again that is extreme last resort, but it has been mentioned.  Same with just doing individual county leagues has been mentioned down here.  As for if just this year or carry over to next would depend on a lot with the virus situation. South Florida 100% will not be ready to go July 27th that is for sure.

Palm Beach County goes back on Monday....

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Seminole County allowed teams to start practicing a couple of weeks ago; I haven't heard of any Covid-19 infections reported by high school football teams in Seminole to date. Teams in Orange County returned this week to official practice, but most kids in Central Florida have been practicing without coaches for the last couple of months. We didn't get a spike in cases until irresponsible young adults hit the bars and clubs in force when  the bars re-opened. The big spike has been in the 21-35 year old age groups. They are currently testing about 80,000 people a day in the state of Florida; that's over four times as many a day as they were testing two months ago. Doctors and scientists have reported that infections in young adults have been less severe with a small percentage requiring clinical or hospital care Most young adults have been asymptomatic or mildly effected. If cities can allow thousands of protesters to fill the streets, standing in close proximity to each other, with little concern of the virus spreading, the FHSAA should be able to figure out how to put 22 kids on a 40 by 100 yard football field. The schools opening and sports being played has become a political football leading up to the November elections,, as well as a showdown between teachers who want to remain home and parents who want to send their kids to school so the parents can return to work. Teachers, coaches, officials, and others who may be at greater risk of infection may just have to sit it out this school year until a vaccine is found or they feel confident about returning. Special consideration regarding their pay during their time away may have to be put in place as the Federal government has done in the recent past. Kids need to be in school and they deserve to play sports.

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5 hours ago, Cjm04 said:

Palm Beach County goes back on Monday....

I'm not saying it will, but I wouldn't be surprised if that gets pushed back or shut down.  Broward was supposed to start Monday and just decided to push it back again.  Been going week to week. 6th to 13th now the 20th.

Also, Palm Beach school board just announced a few hours ago that they will be starting school fully virtual next month.

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2 minutes ago, blystr2002 said:

I'm not saying it will, but I wouldn't be surprised if that gets pushed back or shut down.  Broward was supposed to start Monday and just decided to push it back again.  Been going week to week. 6th to 13th now the 20th.

Also, Palm Beach school board just announced a few hours ago that they will be starting school fully virtual next month.

No they didn't.  The teachers union emailed CTA members and let them know their recommendations.  Palm Beach County will make their announcement after a vote on the 15th.

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4 minutes ago, Cjm04 said:

No they didn't.  The teachers union emailed CTA members and let them know their recommendations.  Palm Beach County will make their announcement after a vote on the 15th.

Your correct vote is the 15th.  The school board are recommending though it stay virtual as well after working with health experts. Not just the teachers union.

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On 7/7/2020 at 2:30 PM, badbird said:

lol do you think they are reopening because of football and shut down because it was baseball/softball?

The reason they want to reopen schools this Fall is so parents can go back to work. Also, it has been almost universally agreed upon that on-line schooling has been a total disaster. My grandsons, both honor students in a Central Florida high school, have participated with on-line schooling this past semester and their opinion is "why bother if this is the best you can offer". A good percentage of students have not even participated. If they don't reopen the schools, I would rather see them defund the schools, lay off the teachers, and rebate our school taxes; not that I expect that would ever happen. Kids belong in school. The CFYFL, one of the the youth tackle football programs in Central Florida, recently completed their Spring football season (5 or 6 games per team, pus playoff game) with no reported Covid-19 infections. Maybe the FHSAA should contact them and see how they did it successfully.

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